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"I'm gay." As more and more young people announce this is their identity, it's time to take a closer look. It's a profound declaration, a new civil right (they are told) and it's "who you are." But there's a problem. Are we sure this is the truth? Does this identity bring the promised liberation and the key to a whole new life? Does it lift the burden of secrecy - or begin a different kind of struggle?
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Wrong diagnosis, wrong cure for 'gay' youth

CDC jumps to pro-'gay' conclusions in analysis of YRBS teen data


by Linda Harvey, World Net Daily


What’s worse than asking ninth-graders intrusive and sexually explicit questions on a school survey, even if they do live in a liberal district?

It’s discovering misbehavior, coming to exactly the wrong conclusion about the causes and recommending more harm be done.

A new report published by the Centers for Disease Control shows that teenagers in public schools who believe themselves to be homosexual or bisexual are taking more risks all across the board. While this should not come as a big surprise to the average American with common sense, it is a stunning revelation to our psychobabbly federal public health professionals. After all, they can’t even bring themselves to say “Stop it!” to men who have anal sex with other men.

The National Youth Risk Behavior Surveys are given to high schoolers, and the Centers for Disease Control looked at the data from 2001 to 2009 in the states of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Vermont, Wisconsin and the cities of Boston, Chicago, Milwaukee, New York City, San Francisco and San Diego, locales where the schools permitted questions about homosexual identity/behavior, which isn’t always the case in less “progressive” areas.

Teens who called themselves “gay, lesbian or bisexual,” or who were unsure, as well as those who didn’t use those labels but had sexual contact only with same-sex people or with both sexes, were found to be more likely than heterosexually identified students to engage in seven out of the 10 risk behavior categories.

ARTICLE continues on WND.com HERE.